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Posted By: David Holcombe
Posted On: Friday December 1, 2017 at 7:47 AM
 
Message:
Good one! Here's a paragraph that also helps:
"Ordering people around, which used to be just a way to get things done, was elevated to a science in October of 1910, when Louis Brandeis, a fifty-three-year-old lawyer from Boston, held a meeting at an apartment in New York with a bunch of experts who, at Brandeis’s urging, decided to call what they were experts at “scientific management.” Everyone there—including Frank and Lillian Gilbreth, best known today as the parents in “Cheaper by the Dozen”—had contracted “Tayloritis”: they were enthralled by an industrial engineer from Philadelphia named Frederick Winslow Taylor, who had been ordering people around, scientifically, for years. Speedy Taylor, as he was called, had invented a new way to make money. He would get himself hired by some business; spend a while watching people work, stopwatch and slide rule in hand; write a report telling them how to do their work faster; and then submit an astronomical bill for his services. He is the “Father of Scientific Management” (it says so on his tombstone), and, by any rational calculation, the grandfather of management consulting." Jill Lepore, NEW YORKER, issue of Oct. 12, 2009

Lepore's book review of Matthew Stewart's “The Management Myth: Why the Experts Keep Getting It Wrong” (Norton; $27.95) continues: Matthew Stewart points out what Taylor’s enemies and even some of his colleagues pointed out, nearly a century ago: Taylor fudged his data, lied to his clients, and inflated the record of his success. The basis for Scientific Management was exaggeration of results and minimization of problems and costs.

Perhaps Mr. Ford and his plant managers had more to do with the results than some believe?

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Message thread:

On this day in automotive history. by Michael Rodriguez #35954
Good read. However, it was really Ransom Olds who developed the first automotive assembly line. by Frank Kocour #35954.1
Good one! Here's a paragraph that also helps: by David Holcombe #35954.2




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