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Diecast Forums Forum 43 Diecast Zone

Posted By: Graeme Ogg
Posted On: Saturday February 8, 2020 at 6:37 AM
 
Message:
Since we seem to be on technical roll here ...
I can just throw in the snippet of information that the "rubber" in question really IS rubber. It was Charles Goodyear, the tyre (tire) man, who in the course of experiments to try and make ordinary soft rubber more durable and resistant to wear and deformation, discovered that if it was heated in the presence of sulfur (don't ask me why) a process of chemical cross-bonding too place which gave the desired result and also proved much more resistant to heat. This treatment was labelled "vulcanization" after Vulcan, the Roman god of fire. (It is spelt with an "s" on this side of the pond, by the way.)

However, I read that good old natural latex rubber, even when treated this way, has a maximum temperature resistance of a around 250 degrees, which is OK for some "white metal" mixes which can be poured at somewhere around 180 - 220 degrees. But some alloys run hotter than that, so we may be talking about silicone rubber here. That is a synthetic rubber, but it also has to be cured by "vulcanisation" and is then good for 450 degrees or more. Nonetheless it is still affected by the heat and starts to degrade quite quickly (maybe after as little as a dozen or so castings if you're really unlucky, maybe 30 or 40 if you're doing well) and the mould needs replacing.

Maybe JR or someone from Brooklin will correct me on any details I got wrong.

Can I have my morning coffee now?

Go back to Diecast Forums Forum 43 Diecast Zone

Message thread:

(PIC) Here is a good example of a serious banana shape... by Lloyd Mecca #27275
I saw one of those on ebay by carl parrish #27275.1
Why not a CLAIM to the owner of NEO? IS A FRAUD!!!!! (EOM) by renato camesasca #27275.1.1
Carl, you are right! I use to have quite a collection of Neo models, by Alex Taylor #27275.1.2
I have quite a few white metal models that are laughable as well...not by Bob Jackman #27275.1.2.1
Point of order - white metal models are not diecast. by Harvey Goranson #27275.1.2.2
Whatever they are made of, they can all be good, bad or indifferent. by Graeme Ogg #27275.1.2.2.1
Well stated Graeme. (EOM) by Harvey Goranson #27275.1.2.2.1.1
If a model looks right to me and I like it I will buy it whether it's a cheap diecast or by Rich Pendleton #27275.1.2.2.1.1.1
I just have one NEO model. Although that another one tease me by Michel Lemieux #27275.1.2.2.1.1.1.1
I'm delighted with my NEOs -- I just avoided the inaccuate subjects--or those that have gone bananas (EOM) by Mark Lampariello #27275.1.2.2.1.2
+1. Some of them are very good, like this Maserati. by Harvey Goranson #27275.1.2.2.1.2.1
Brooklin are centrifugally cast in rubber molds, so that means they are not diecast. Is... by Karl Schnelle #27275.1.2.2.2
Yes, I think it's just a matter of conventional terminology. by Graeme Ogg #27275.1.2.2.2.1
Thanks, man! Part of the fun in collecting is knowing these type details! (EOM) by Karl Schnelle #27275.1.2.2.2.1.1
Which brings up another point Karl. by Harvey Goranson #27275.1.2.2.2.1.1.1
All good points, but let's not forget the fine old slush cast models. (pic) by David Holcombe #27275.1.2.2.2.1.2
Always great to see the old ones, thanks. (EOM) by Rich Pendleton #27275.1.2.2.2.1.2.1
Who can explain how hot molten metal can be poured into by John Quilter #27275.1.2.2.3
Low melting point metal and high melting point molds. by Harvey Goranson #27275.1.2.2.3.1
Spin Casting White Metal by John Daniels #27275.1.2.2.3.1.1
Different types of rubber used for moulds. Brooklin and by John Roberts #27275.1.2.2.3.1.1.1
That mold looks just like the ones we used at MTI (EOM) by Rich Pendleton #27275.1.2.2.3.1.1.2
Since we seem to be on technical roll here ... by Graeme Ogg #27275.1.2.2.3.1.2
No! Are your degrees in Celsius? Now you can have your coffee. (EOM) by John Kuvakas #27275.1.2.2.3.1.2.1
Yes! My degrees are in Chemical Engineering! So those values are C! :-) (EOM) by Karl Schnelle #27275.1.2.2.3.1.2.1.1
Speaking of rubber, can we find a way to unvalcanize by John Quilter #27275.1.2.2.3.1.2.2
Tyres can be recycled OK. by Graeme Ogg #27275.1.2.2.3.1.2.2.1
And the money to do it. (EOM) by Harvey Goranson #27275.1.2.2.3.1.2.2.1.1




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